Affordable Care Act, Health Disparities, Health Equity, Health Justice, Health Policy, Health Reform, Inequality, Medicaid, Pennsylvania

PA HB 2138 Heads to the Senate

Pennsylvania House Bill 2138 which would allow for work requirements in Medicaid has successfully been voted out of the Health Committee and will come to a full vote by the Senate. It is critical that PA residents contact their state senator now to urge him or her to vote NO on HB 2138.

This bill will unnecessarily punish families and children living in poverty at the administrative expense of taxpayers. Check out our past blog to remind yourself of how the law would work.

The Urban Institute did a comprehensive review of the literature on work requirements in public assistance programs and found that the evidence shows these programs fail to meet their stated goals at the detriment of individuals losing life-saving benefits.

Summary of Work Requirements in TANF, SNAP, and Housing Assistance Programs as of December 2017

This article was cross-posted at http://www.helpmlp.org

Education, Health Disparities, Health Equity, Inequality, Medication, Social Determinants of Health

Using Medication to Treat Social Ills

The critical need for a social determinants approach to health care is illustrated in an article in today’s NY Times.  In “Attention Disorder or Not, Pills to Help in School” Atlanta doctor, Michael Anderson, explains that he prescribes Adderall to help even the educational “playing field” for low-income students.  Prescribing Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) medication helps provide an edge to low-income students who are often struggling in schools that are under-resourced, yet are competing with students from higher-income families and schools for college admissions.  Dr. Anderson sees himself as employing his form of “social justice” noting, “I don’t have a whole lot of choice. We’ve decided as a society that it’s too expensive to modify the kid’s environment. So we have to modify the kid.”

The possible short and long-term effects of prescribing stimulant ADHD medication to adolescents are discussed within the article, and some may find it shocking that parents and physicians would choose to prescribe medications in light of these risks.  However, a quick look at national disparities data shows that obtaining higher education is a matter of life or death.  According to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, college graduates are expected to live at least five years longer than those who do not graduate from college.  A mother’s education is also correlated with infant mortality; the lower her educational attainment the higher the risk for infant mortality.  Additionally, the higher one’s education the less likely they are to develop chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and obesity.  While Dr. Anderson’s clinical practices are certainly controversial and guaranteed to invite criticism, I applaud him for exposing such an important issue and calling for policies that address the true causes of health and social inequities.